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Happiness is the First Bite of Well-Cooked Steak: Angus Beef & More!

Aberdeen Angus - a well-known Angus beef bred in Ireland and grass-fed. With the integration of traditional pasture farming and advanced technology, the cattles are fed to be of high quality and more tender.

Meat lovers feel excited when a smoking plate of beefsteak arrives in front of them and the delicious smell wafting from it almost creates a mouth-watering trance!

With so many types of beefs favoured by men and women all over the world, the Angus beef along with the Irish beef will feature as an intriguing topic of discussion. However, before delving into the spicy crust of beefsteak recipes, let’s take a look back at the gluttonous history of “Steak”.

Stake of the Steak!

The “Beefsteak Dinner” became a culinary spectacle of New York in the 1800’s. Steak has an interesting story behind.

The beefsteak gained tremendous fame in American society where it graduated from local pubs to more formal gala spaces, becoming a masculine feasting event where napkins, knives and other social etiquettes dissipated. Soon, the beefsteak became a hub for the community to gather mostly around political issues or fundraising affairs.

Previously called Aberdeen Angus, this particular beef comes from a Scottish cattle breed representing one of the most used breeds in the world for beef production. They possess more meat than other breeds on their bones and perhaps, that’s the reason why both manufacturers and consumers favour them so much. The distinctive “marbling” (fat flecks) add rich flavour to a steak recipe!

At first, beef was avoided as a food item by the Irish people who considered cow to be a symbol of good fortune particularly by the Gaelics. It was only in the 16th century, when England conquered Ireland and brought in the grand tradition of savouring beef meat. Ireland soon became the go-to place for “corned” Irish beef production!

EUROPEANBEEF

High quality

ENJOY IT'S FROM EUROPE

Cattle raised in Ireland

Knowledge of tradition,
advantages of technology

Ireland has a rich tradition of pasture farming
and its breeding industry is still one of the most important industries today.
State-of-the-art technology and knowledge of tradition contribute to the growth of
a large and healthy cattle population: in 5 million hectares of pasture live 122,00 herds,
with an average of 53 heads of livestock per herd.

Belgian Blue

Belgian Blue

The appearance of their powerful musculature is known as “double musculature.” The double musculature phenotype is an inherited condition resulting from the increased amount of muscle fiber (hyperplasia) rather than a normal enlargement of individual muscle fiber (hypertrophy).
This breed has a larger capacity for converting feed into lean muscles, which results in special types of low fat meat. Belgian Blue takes its name from the blue-gray patches on its coat, but the color can vary from white to black. It is a tender and tasty meat with an exceptionally low amount of fat.
The Belgian Blue breed is the result of passionate selection while respecting the natural growth and development of the animal, raised according to traditional methods and fed only on hay and farm produce.
As adults, the most beautiful specimens weigh up to 1,100 kg, with a 66% yield at slaughter.

Angus

Angus

Aberdeen Angus is one of the most famous cattle breeds in the world.
Its coat has short black hair. Black pigmented mucosae and skin.No horns and prominent sinciput. The animals have a short stature (short limbs) but heavy weight (females: 7-7.5 quintals; males: 10-11 quintals). Small head, fine skeleton, deep and wide chest. Soft and supple skin.
Resistant to UV rays and can sustain infestations from Diptera and worms.
Excellent adaptability to grazing.
Good fertility and longevity.
Very few problems at delivery.
High quality meat (tender and tasty), with high fat content.

Charolaise

Charolaise

The coat is a creamy white or off-white color. The mucosae are a depigmented rosy color. The head is small and short, especially in males, with a wide forehead. Big eyes, medium sized and motile ears. Cylindrical trunk and excellent hindquarter development.Short, yellowish horns with forward facing black tips. Massive animals with excellent development of the muscular masses and a medium stature Female live weight: 7-9 quintals; male life weight: 12-13 quintals. Cows nurse the calves after delivery and milk production is sufficient until weaning (6-7 months).
Exceptional adaptability to different breeding conditions. Scarce resistance to sunlight (depigmented skin).
Excellent characteristics for (high quality) meat production. In Italy, Charolaise cattle are used for the production of calves aged 16-18 months with live weight of 600-650 kg.

Limousine

Limousine

The coat is a vivid fawn color, not too bold, lighter in the ventral and perineal regions. Discolored halo around the eyes and muzzle. Mucosae of a rosy depigmented color. Lighter colored, forward facing horns of medium length. Sturdy, energetic, tough and rustic animals. Medium height and high average live weight (females: 6.5-8 quintals; males: 10-12 quintals).
The famous “veau de boucherie” (white meat calf) is of Limousine breed. It has high precocity, yielding a high amount of lean meat at the youngest age. For this reason, it has an essential role industrial crossbreeding for the production of fattening subjects, destined for slaughter at a few months old. Bulls are used in industrial crossbreeding to obtain high yield F subjects. The newborn calves are small but grow quickly.
The meat quality is very good, with a fine grain and non-coarse fibers.

Hereford

Hereford

The coat is a more or less intense red color with a white head. White spots at throat, dewlap, belly, neck-withers-shoulders. Rosy depigmented muzzle. The stature tends to be short, but the animals are massive (female live weight: 8 quintals; male live weight: 12-13 quintals). Light skeleton covered with large muscular masses. Short and thin limbs. Forward and downward oriented short, yellowish horns. There are polled subjects, for example, without horns.
Very suitable breed for pasture farming (fattens quickly and easily). Good fertility and longevity. Very few problems at delivery.
Plentiful production of high quality meat (often with excessive fat content).